Media

Daily Updates

Counting continues in the 2020 local government elections and state by-elections.

The ECQ has formally declared results in uncontested local government elections. A total of 15 mayors and 31 councillors across 24 local government areas have been officially declared as elected under section 100 of the Local Government Electoral Act 2011. View the election results notices.

These positions only had one candidate in the local government elections and, following notification in The Courier Mail and local newspapers, the candidates have been officially declared to be elected. The listed of elected candidates is below.

Returning officers are continuing to count votes in individual local government areas and in the Bundamba and Currumbin by-elections, and the process of exchanging votes between Brisbane City Council wards is also being undertaken under strict requirements that apply to the transfer of ballot papers.

The return and scrutiny of the approximately 570,000 postal votes from the local government elections is ongoing.  To date, almost 213,000 postal votes have been returned, scrutinised and either admitted to or rejected from the count for the local government elections, with another 3,500 postal votes scrutinised for the Currumbin and Bundamba by-elections.  Those postal votes will now be returned to the relevant Returning Officer for counting.

The deadline for return of postal votes is Tuesday, 7 April 2020.  Due to the large volume of postal votes in the local government elections, it may be necessary to await the return, scrutiny and counting of postal votes in order to determine the outcome of close contests.

Elected candidates

ELECTION

ELECTED CANDIDATES

Banana Shire Council

MAYOR

FERRIER, Neville

DIVISION 3 COUNCILLOR

CASEY, Phillip

DIVISION 4 COUNCILLOR

SEMPLE, Colin George

DIVISION 5 COUNCILLOR

LEO, Brooke

DIVISION 6 COUNCILLOR

BOYCE, Terri

Boulia Shire Council

MAYOR

BRITTON, Eric

Bundaberg Regional Council

DIVISION 2 COUNCILLOR

TREVOR, William Robert

DIVISION 8 COUNCILLOR

COOPER, Stephen

Burke Shire Council

MAYOR

CAMP, Ernest

Central Highlands Regional Council

MAYOR

HAYES, Kerry Michael

Cloncurry Shire Council

MAYOR

CAMPBELL, Gregory

Gold Coast City Council

DIVISION 5 COUNCILLOR

YOUNG, Peter

Goondiwindi Regional Council

MAYOR

SPRINGBORG, Lawrence

Hinchinbrook Shire Council

MAYOR

JAYO, Ramon

Isaac Regional Council

MAYOR

BAKER, Anne

DIVISION 1 COUNCILLOR

AUSTEN, Gregory

DIVISION 3 COUNCILLOR

LACEY, Gina

DIVISION 4 COUNCILLOR

WEST, Simon

DIVISION 5 COUNCILLOR

VEA VEA, Kelly

DIVISION 6 COUNCILLOR

JONES, Lynette

DIVISION 7 COUNCILLOR

PICKELS, Jane Mary

Lockyer Valley Regional Council

MAYOR

MILLIGAN, Tanya

Mackay Regional Council

MAYOR

WILLIAMSON, Gregory

Moreton Bay Regional Council

DIVISION 7 COUNCILLOR

SIMS, Denise

DIVISION 10 COUNCILLOR

CONSTANCE, Matthew

North Burnett Regional Council

MAYOR

CHAMBERS, Rachel Louise

Quilpie Shire Council

MAYOR

MACKENZIE, Stuart Alexander

Richmond Shire Council

MAYOR

WHARTON, John McArthur

Rockhampton Regional Council

DIVISION 3 COUNCILLOR

WILLIAMS, Anthony

DIVISION 4 COUNCILLOR

SMITH, Catherine Ellen

DIVISION 6 COUNCILLOR

WICKERSON, Michael Drew

Scenic Rim Regional Council

DIVISION 6 COUNCILLOR

MCINNES, Duncan

Somerset Regional Council

MAYOR

LEHMANN, Graeme

South Burnett Regional Council

DIVISION 1 COUNCILLOR

FROHLOFF, Roslyn

DIVISION 2 COUNCILLOR

JONES, Gavin

Torres Strait Island Regional Council

DIVISION 2 COUNCILLOR

ELISALA, Torenzo

DIVISION 6 COUNCILLOR

TRINKOON, Lama

DIVISION 10 COUNCILLOR

TAMU, Kabay

DIVISION 13 COUNCILLOR

STEPHEN, Rocky Gabriel

Townsville City Council

DIVISION 4 COUNCILLOR

MOLACHINO, Mark

Whitsunday Regional Council

MAYOR

WILLCOX, Andrew

DIVISION 6 COUNCILLOR

BRUNKER, Michael Raymond

Wujal Wujal Aboriginal Shire Council

COUNCILLOR

BLOOMFIELD, Robert

COUNCILLOR

KULKA, Regan

COUNCILLOR

TAYLEY, Vanessa

COUNCILLOR

TAYLEY, Vincent

10.00pm update

The ECQ advises that technical issues are slowing the display of count results on the ECQ website. Our team is working on resolving the issues. The preliminary count has proceeded as expected and the official count begins tomorrow. Results will be available on the website as soon as possible.

In order to ensure candidates can access information regarding the count, one scrutineer per candidate are now immediately allowed entry to polling booths. This direction has been conveyed to booth supervisors and scrutineers will be allowed access to polling booths.

11.30pm update

The preliminary count proceeded as scheduled tonight.  ECQ experienced a data feed issue from polling booths to its website. Additional results from the preliminary count have now been published on the website and the remainder of the count to date will be published tonight.

ECQ is working through the technical issues to ensure the results from the official count are published as scheduled on Sunday.

12.30am 29 March update

The election results website now reflects all votes that have been counted this evening.

If there is a zero reflected beside a local government division it is because the counting officials did not focus on that division but most likely the Mayor count.

When the result, like Brisbane Mayor refers to 41.62%, the gap is because postal votes, telephone votes and probably early votes are yet to be counted.

ECQ will continue to work through the night to test the technical issues which inhibited tonight’s publication of the preliminary count.  ECQ expects the official count to proceed as scheduled tomorrow.

All political parties, candidates, the LGAQ and the media will be notified immediately.

Election Day, Saturday 28 March

Around 750,000 Queenslanders have had their say today in the 2020 local government elections. 

The preliminary count is currently underway at over 1,300 booths across the State.

Early figures suggest around a 75 per cent turnout rate overall, which is approaching the turnout for the 2016 local government elections.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

More than 34,000 people have cast a telephone vote since 16 March.

Postal voting

Approximately 570,000 postal ballots were distributed. These must be returned to the ECQ by Tuesday, 7 April to be included in the count.

Early voting

Over 1.2 million voters attended early voting centres around the state in the 11 early voting days prior to polling day, taking advantage of extended hours during the early voting period.

Results

Today’s polls will decide 77 local government elections and state by-elections.

Preliminary counting is underway, and results will be published on the ECQ website as they are available throughout the evening.

The official count will begin from tomorrow morning. The ECQ expects counting to take longer than usual, due to the changes in procedure to manage social distancing during the count process.

At the end of the early voting period for the 2020 elections at 6pm, over 1.2 million electors had cast their vote.

In addition to the 570,000 people who applied for a postal vote and the 40,000 people who have registered for telephone voting, over 1.8 million people, or 55 per cent of eligible voters, have already voted or made arrangements to vote.  Nearly 150,000 electors cast their votes today.

Due to the large number of Queenslanders who voted during the early voting period, the expected numbers of people voting on election day has been significantly reduced.

Scrutineers and election signage

The ECQ’s Direction about Candidates and Scrutineers at Particular Place will apply for the counting process for the 2020 elections. The Direction limits the access of scrutineers during preliminary and official counts to support social distancing measures in line with advice from Queensland’s Chief Health Officer.

In addition, under new electoral regulations, election signage cannot be erected around polling booths until 5am on election day, Saturday 28 March.

Penalties of up to 20 penalty units (currently valued at $2,669) apply to the scrutineering restrictions and 10 penalty units apply to the election signage restrictions.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

More than 40,000 people have registered for a telephone vote.

Registrations are open until 12pm tomorrow, and voters have until 6pm, the close of polling on election day, to cast their vote. The Commissioner continues to urge healthy voters to stay off the phones and vote in person. Telephone voting is a limited service specifically for our most vulnerable and isolated citizens.

Postal voting

Approximately 120,000 of the 570,000 postal vote ballots have been returned to the ECQ to date.

Postal votes must be returned to the ECQ before 7 April to be included in the count, however, postal voters are urged to return their postal ballots as soon as possible.

Results

The ECQ expects the counting and declaration process to take a little longer than usual. This is due to the unprecedented number of postal votes, as well as the social distancing measures that will be in place for the count.

The ECQ will commence a preliminary count on election night, and results will be available on the ECQ website.

The official count will begin on Sunday morning and contests will be declared when it is clear and certain who the successful candidate is (i.e it becomes mathematically impossible for anyone else to by successful). Declarations will be published progressively on the ECQ website.

More than 1 million electors have cast their vote ahead of the local government elections on Saturday.

This is in addition to the 570,000 people who will receive a postal vote. This means that nearly half of eligible voters have voted, or have made arrangements to vote, ahead of Saturday’s polling day.

The Chief Health Officer Dr Jeannette Young has again reassured Queenslanders that there is no risk going to vote on Saturday.

Dr Young said “we know, due to our fantastic pre-polling arrangements, and with the way Queenslanders have responded, and with the postal vote process, with all of that the number of Queenslanders left to vote by Saturday will be relatively small”.

Scrutineers and election signage

The ECQ has issued a Direction regarding scrutineering arrangements at the elections, in accordance with new electoral regulations which came into force on 26 March 2020.

Under the regulations, no election signage can be erected around polling booths until 5am on election day, Saturday 28 March.

The number of scrutineers observing the count is now limited to one per candidate, in order to support social distancing measures throughout the count.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

More than 30,000 people have registered for a telephone vote, and more than 20,000 have voted, leaving around 10,000 people still to vote by phone.

The Commissioner continues to urge healthy voters to stay off the phones and vote in person. Telephone voting is a limited service specifically for our most vulnerable and isolated citizens.

Early Voting

As at 6.30pm, over 120,000 electors had cast their votes with booths staying open until 9pm this evening. This brings the total number of early voters to over 1 million.

Yesterday was the biggest day so far for early voting, with over 140,000 people casting their vote to 9pm yesterday.

Early voting centres will open until 9pm tonight, and 6pm on Friday.

Postal voting

All 570 000 postal vote ballots have now been lodged with Australia Post for delivery.

Completed ballot material should be returned to the ECQ as soon as possible to assist with the counting process – the deadline for completion is 6pm on election day, but it is not necessary to wait until this time.

If voters are concerned they will not receive their postal ballots in time to vote, they can still vote at early voting centres, or on election day.

The Electoral Commissioner has implored healthy Queenslanders not to apply for telephone voting.

Telephone voting is a limited service specifically for our most vulnerable and isolated citizens. The ECQ has increased capacity ten-fold to help extend the service to people who have been advised to self-isolate as a result of COVID-19.  However, the telephone voting service is experiencing unprecedented demand, including people who are not eligible for a telephone vote, jeopardising the availability of the service for those who most need it.

Most electors are able to vote in person and precautions are being taken to ensure voting is quick and safe.

To help voters better understand the additional health measures in place in polling booths and early voting centres, the ECQ has released a short video.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

More than 26,000 people have registered for a telephone vote, and more than 16,000 have voted, leaving around 10,000 people still to vote by phone.

Early voting

Today was the biggest day to date for early voting. As at 5.30pm, nearly 120,000 electors had cast their votes with booths staying open until 9pm this evening. This brings the total number of early voters to over 870,000.

Centres will open until 9pm today and tomorrow, and 6pm on Friday.

Postal voting

All 570 000 postal vote ballots have now been lodged with Australia Post for delivery.

Completed ballot material should be returned to the ECQ as soon as possible to assist with the counting process – the deadline for completion is 6pm on election day, but it is not necessary to wait until this time.

If voters are concerned they will not receive their postal ballots in time to vote, they can still vote at early voting centres, or on election day.

More than 1.3 million Queenslanders have already voted or will receive a postal vote, ahead of election day, 28 March.

Approximately 750,000 voters have attended early voting centres, and a further 570,000 are receiving postal ballots.

The number of telephone voters is at record numbers, with over 11,000 votes to date. The ECQ has increased its capacity to accept telephone votes, extending telephone voting hours over the next three days to 8am to 9pm and doubling the number of people available to take votes. The ECQ is urging people who have registered to vote as soon as possible.

Early Voting

As at 6pm, over 110,000 electors had cast their votes on the seventh day of early voting, bringing the total number of early voters to over 750,000.

Centres will open until 6pm this week, and until 9pm on Wednesday and Thursday.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

Telephone voting is available to people who are eligible under legislation, such as those not able to attend a polling place due to impairment or disability. People who have been advised by a medical practitioner to remain in isolation during the election period due to exposure to COVID-19 are also eligible to access telephone voting.

More than 19,000 people have registered for telephone voting and just over 11,000 people have cast their vote as at 5pm.

Financial disclosure

In the seven working days prior to election day, candidates are required to disclose expenditure within 24 hours of incurring it.

On Tuesday 24 March, around 400 returns were received, with more expected overnight.

Postal voting

The vast majority of the 570,000 postal vote ballots have now been lodged with Australia Post for delivery.

Completed ballot material should be returned to the ECQ as soon as possible to assist with the counting process – the deadline for completion is 6pm on election day, but it is not necessary to wait until this time.

If voters are concerned they will not receive their postal ballots in time to vote, they can still vote at early voting centres, or on election day.

The local government elections are proceeding on 28 March. Elections are an essential service that allow local government to form so that they can make decisions about providing services to the community – waste, transport, and community services.  

Early voting is continuing with extended hours for the second week.  The ECQ has created more than 300 additional roles across more than 100 early voting centres to help voters move smoothly through the voting process and maintain social distancing.

Early Voting

Daily voting numbers have remained at high levels at the start of the second week of early voting. As at 6pm, over 100,000 electors had cast their votes on the sixth day of early voting, bringing the total number of early voters to more than 650,000.

Early voting centres will open until 6pm this week, and until 9pm on Wednesday and Thursday.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

Telephone voting is available to people who are eligible under legislation, such as those not able to attend a polling place due to illness, impairment or disability. People who have been advised by a medical practitioner to remain in isolation during the election period due to exposure to COVID-19 are also eligible to access telephone voting.

Almost 14,000 people have registered for telephone voting and nearly 8,000 people have cast their vote as at 5pm. Additional capacity has been provided for the telephone voting service to respond to the high level of demand.

Community fundraising events

The ECQ has written to owners of polling booths confirming that the elections will proceed on 28 March, and requesting that they carefully consider whether community fundraising events should proceed in light of the most recent health advice.

Voter Information Cards

Around three-quarters of today’s voters have presented their Voter Information Cards (hard copy or email) at polling booths. The cards make it faster and easier to mark voters off the roll and issue ballot papers, assisting with quick movement of voters through polling booths.

By-elections

The ECQ is continuing to work to advice from heath authorities and to adjust is election delivery where required.

As a result, voting for the Bundamba by-election is now taking place in an adjacent room to local government election polling at some polling booths in the area. This is to help keep the number of people within each room below 100.

The Count

With just a week until counting begins, the ECQ is revising its standard approach to counting of votes to accommodate the increased number of postal and early ballots, and apply recommended health measures around the size of indoor gatherings.

As a result of these operational adjustments, it is likely that it will take longer for results to be declared.

In a Queensland first, voters have had the opportunity to vote on two consecutive Saturdays in the 2020 local government elections and Currumbin and Bundamba by-elections.  

From today, candidates and volunteers were also required to comply with the new Direction about Display of How-to Vote Cards and Election Material, which prohibits candidates and volunteers from distributing how-to-vote cards.

Early Voting

On the first Saturday of early voting in Queensland, over 65,000 electors had cast their votes on the sixth day of early voting, bringing the total number of early voters to over 500,000. This already exceeds the full early voting period for the 2016 local government elections, with a full week of early voting remaining.

Centres will open until 6pm next week, and until 9pm on Wednesday and Thursday.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

Telephone voting is available to people who are eligible under legislation, such as those not able to attend a polling place due to illness, impairment or disability. People who have been advised by a medical practitioner to remain in isolation during the election period due to exposure to COVID-19 are also eligible to access telephone voting.

Approximately 8,600 people have registered for telephone voting and just over half of these people have cast their vote.

Today, the ECQ contacted all registered telephone voters who have not yet voted, encouraging them to call before election day to have their say.

Postal voting

Following processing of remaining applications, a total of 560,000 postal vote applications have been received.

Completed ballot material should be returned to the ECQ as soon as possible to assist with the counting process – the deadline for completion is 6pm on election day, but it is not necessary to wait until this time.

Voter Information Cards

Over two-thirds of today’s voters have presented their Voter Information Cards (hard copy or email) at polling booths. The cards make it faster and easier to mark voters off the roll and issue ballot papers, assisting with quick movement of voters through polling booths.

The Electoral Commissioner has issued a new Direction regarding display of how-to-vote cards and election material at polling booths.

The Direction PDF (0.05 MB) prohibits all persons from canvassing for votes or distributing how-to-vote cards or election material at polling booths and allows for display of relevant materials at polling booths.

Early voting in the elections continues to exceed planned levels. In addition, the uptake of telephone voting has already surpassed 2016 levels, and this is expected to increase further as telephone voting is offered in place of electoral officer visits to some declared institutions.

Early Voting

As at 5pm, over 95,000 electors had cast their votes on the fifth day of early voting, bringing the total number of early voters to over 500,000.

In a Queensland first, early voting centres will be open from 9am to 5pm on Saturday – tomorrow 21 March. Centres will open until 6pm next week, and until 9pm on Wednesday and Thursday.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

Telephone voting is available to people who are eligible under legislation, such as those not able to attend a polling place due to illness, impairment or disability.

Over 7,500 people have registered for telephone voting and over 3,600 people have cast their vote as at 5pm.

Postal voting

The ECQ continues to process an unprecedented number of postal vote applications. Postal ballots are currently being sent, and the ECQ has begun to receive completed postal ballots.

Completed ballot material should be returned to the ECQ as soon as possible to assist with the counting process – the deadline for completion is 6pm on election day, but it is not necessary to wait until this time.

Voter Information Cards

Nearly two-thirds of today’s voters have presented their Voter Information Cards (hard copy or email) at polling booths. The cards make it faster and easier to mark voters off the roll and issue ballot papers, assisting with quick movement of voters through polling booths.

Early voting centres are again open for late night voting tonight.

Amendments to legislation

Urgent legislation passed by the Parliament on the evening of 18 March 2020 provides contingency powers for the Minister for Local Government, in consultation with ECQ, to suspend or terminate the elections.

These powers will only be exercised if expert health advice indicates that this necessary.

In addition, the legislation provides additional powers for these elections, including allowing additional people to be declared eligible for telephone voting and giving directions about distribution of how-to-vote cards.

Direction about distribution and display of how-to-vote cards and other election material at polling booths

Following the legislative amendments, under the Local Government Electoral Act 2011 and the Electoral Act 1992, the Commissioner has issued a Direction about distribution and display of how-to-vote cards and other election material at polling booths. This directs candidates to support social distancing and make use of alternate how-to-vote card and election material distribution methods, including static display, use of a common collection point, or electronic distribution to electors away from a polling booth.

Queensland Chief Health Officer Dr Jeannette Young has written to the Department of Premier and Cabinet, expressing her satisfaction with the ECQ’s plan for election delivery.

Dr Young said “The risk of contracting COVID-19 at a polling location is low… people will be frequently entering and exiting the environment; spending little time in static close contact, which reduces the risk of spread of COVID-19.

“I appreciate the measures being proposed by Electoral Commission Queensland as they should address the risk of community transmission of COVID-19, while allowing important electoral processes to continue.”

EarlyVoting

As at 5pm, over 100,000 electors had cast their votes on the fourth day of early voting, bringing the total number of early voters to approximately 400,000.

Centres will open until 9pm tonight, and next Wednesday and Thursday, and from 9am to 5pm this Saturday, 21 March. Opening hours vary at different centres and details are published on the ECQ website.

Advice for candidates

The ECQ has written to candidates outlining the additional measures it has put in place following yesterday’s National Cabinet decision to ban non-essential indoor gatherings of more than 100 people. This advice is available on the ECQ website.

The ECQ acknowledges the efforts of candidates and their volunteers to limit contact when distributing how-to-vote cards.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

Telephone voting is available to people who are eligible under legislation, such as those not able to attend a polling place due to illness, impairment or disability.

Over 5000 people have registered for telephone voting and over 2000 people had cast their vote as at 5pm.

Queue management

The ECQ has identified 121 early voting centres that could ordinarily be expected to attract more than 100 people at one time. Additional staff will be on-site so that no more than 100 people are inside polling places at any one time, and those waiting outside have the opportunity to practice social distancing.

How-to-vote cards

Today was the last day for candidates to submit their how-to-vote cards to the ECQ for approval.

The ECQ has approved and published more than 250 how-to-vote cards on its website.

24-hour disclosure commences

With seven business days until polling day, political candidates must now disclose all electoral expenditure and gifts and loans received within 24 hours.

Postal voting

The ECQ continues to process an unprecedented number of postal vote applications. More than a third have already been posted, and the ECQ has begun to receive completed postal ballots.

Completed ballot material should be returned to the ECQ as soon as possible to assist with the counting process – the deadline for completion is 6pm on election day, but it is not necessary to wait until this time.

Voter Information Cards

Nearly two-thirds of today’s voters have presented their Voter Information Cards (hard copy or email) at polling booths. The cards make it faster and easier to mark voters off the roll and issue ballot papers, assisting with quick movement of voters through polling booths.

Early polling centres are open for late night voting tonight in a Queensland first.

The Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) is initiating additional measures to manage the movement of people through polling places following the National Cabinet’s decision to ban non-essential static indoor gatherings of more than 100 people.

Queensland Electoral Commissioner, Pat Vidgen, said that the ECQ had identified the polling places with higher expected numbers of voters.

For these booths, we will put additional measures in place to make sure only 100 people are inside at any one time, and voters waiting outside have the space they need to practice social distancing.

Voters should continue to observe the guidelines outlined by the Prime Minister regarding maintaining distances of 1.5 metres and applying appropriate hygiene practices.

Staff will be on hand inside the polling booths to help move people through the voting process efficiently.

Early Voting

As at 5pm, almost 100,000 electors had cast their votes on the third day of early voting. Voting will continue until 9pm on 18 March.

In a Queensland first, almost 130 early voting centres will implement extended opening hours. Centres will open until 9pm tonight, and from 9am to 9pm tomorrow, next Wednesday and Thursday, and from 9am to 5pm this Saturday, 21 March. Opening hours vary at different centres.

Advice for candidates

The ECQ will provide further advice to candidates updating them on the additional measures and thanking them for their support in changing the way how to vote cards are distributed.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

Telephone voting is available to people who are eligible under legislation, such as those not able to attend a polling place due to illness, impairment or disability.

Over 3,500 people have registered for telephone voting and over 1,300 people had cast their vote as at 5pm.

Voter Information Cards

Nearly half of all early voters are presenting their Voter Information Cards (hard copy or email) at polling booths. The cards make it faster and easier to mark voters off the roll and issue ballot papers.

After the second day of early voting in the 2020 local government elections and Currumbin and Bundamba by-elections, almost 170,000 electors have already cast their votes.

The public response to the declaration of COVID-19 as a global pandemic, has seen a sharp increase in early voting figures at the start of the 2020 local government elections.

On 17 March, over 95,000 people voted, in addition to the almost 74,000 people who voted on the first day of early voting.

Opening hours in almost 130 early voting centres will be extended, starting from Wednesday, 18 March, with most centres staying open until 9pm on Wednesday and Thursday, and opening on Saturday, 21 March.

In addition, the ECQ is encouraging electors that are more vulnerable to COVID-19, including Queenslanders aged 60 and over, to vote early between 9am and 11am each day.  Additional ECQ staff will be available to provide support for vulnerable electors during the voting process.

The ECQ has received a record number of postal vote applications, with over 520,000 applications received and approximately 40,000 applications still be processed.

Early Voting

After the second day of early voting, approximately 170,000 early votes were received as at 5pm, with 95,000 votes cast today.

Extended opening hours will be implemented at almost 130 early voting centres across Queensland, with most centres opening from 9am to 9pm on Wednesdays and Thursdays, as well as on Saturday, 21 March.

Additionally, vulnerable people, including those aged 60 or over, are being encouraged to vote between 9am and 11am each day.

Postal Votes

At the close of applications at 7pm on 16 March 2020, approximately 540,000 postal vote applications had been received with additional emails still being processed.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

Telephone voting is available to people who are eligible under legislation, such as those not able to attend a polling place due to illness, impairment or disability.

Almost 2,000 people have registered for telephone voting as at 5pm.

Declared institutions

In order to protect the health of vulnerable people, the ECQ has today cancelled its planned visits to aged care facilities.

Returning Officers are contacting these facilities to support residents apply for postal or telephone voting where eligible.

Customer contact

The ECQ is providing support to voters by phone, email, and via its social media platforms.

Approximately 6,400 calls and 6,300 emails were received by the call centre as at 5pm.

Through social media channels Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, over 250 messages were received on 17 March.

Voter Information Cards

All Voter Information Cards (VICs) for both the local government elections and state by-elections have been printed and lodged for delivery with Australia Post.

All electronic VICs have been emailed to electors whose email addresses are listed on the electoral roll.

There are 3.2 million voters in Queensland who will be voting in the 2020 local government elections and Currumbin and Bundamba by-elections.

With the declaration of COVID-19 as a global pandemic, the Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) has revised its service delivery model for the 2020 elections to ensure that voters can safely participate in the elections.

Early voting commenced as planned on 16 March, with voting figures in line with expectations. However, there has been an unprecedented level of demand for applications for postal votes in the elections, with an additional 130,000 applications received in 24 hours. This has also been reflected in large numbers of calls and emails to the ECQ’s 110 staff member call centre, which has been operating at capacity.

The ECQ also released two fact sheets today regarding the impact of COVID-19 and additional protection measures being implemented for the elections. These fact sheets are available on the ECQ website.

Early Voting

Approximately 130 early voting centres opened around the state for the first day of early voting. On the first day of early voting, approximately 73,900 early votes were received as at 5pm.

Arrangements to extend the opening hours of early voting centres are being implemented based on availability at individual centres.

Postal Votes

Approximately 487,000 postal vote applications had been received as at 5pm, with applications due to close at 7pm.

Additional options were provided to voters to ensure they could lodge a postal vote application by email prior to the deadline.

Additional design and print services have been secured to ensure sufficient ballot papers would be available to meet increased demand.

Electronically assisted voting (telephone voting)

Telephone voting is available to people who are eligible under legislation, such as those not able to attend a polling place due to illness, impairment or disability.

162 applications for telephone voting had been received and 68 votes had been lodged as at 5pm.

Declared institutions

A number of residential care homes and hospitals are “declared institutions”. Election officials visit

these institutions to allow residents to vote.

In order to protect the health of vulnerable people, the ECQ has today cancelled its planned visits to nursing homes.

The ECQ has instructed its Returning Officers to contact each declared institution in their electorates and support its residents in applying for postal or telephone voting.

Customer contact

The ECQ is providing support to voters by phone, email, and via its social media platforms. Approximately 6,800 calls and 1,900 emails were received by the call centre as at 5pm.

Through social media channels Facebook and Twitter, over 700 messages were handled over the weekend of 14-15 March, with approximately 8,600 individual engagements (likes, comments and shares).

Voter Information Cards

All Voter Information Cards (VICs) for both the local elections and state by-elections have been printed and lodged for delivery with Australia Post.

All electronic VICs will be emailed by 7pm this evening.

2020 Media Statements

Count continuing in local government elections

The preliminary count was conducted in the local government elections as scheduled following the close of polling on election day, 28 March 2020.

Due to a technical issue with the data feed from polling booths to the ECQ’s results website, the publication of the preliminary count results was delayed.

This did not affect the count process itself or the recording of results from over 1,000 polling booths around the state.

The ECQ worked immediately to address the issues with the data feed, with all results from the preliminary count published on the website by 11.45pm.

To ensure transparency of the counting process while the publication of results was delayed, the ECQ contacted all candidates and political parties to advise that they would be admitted to polling booths to scrutinise the voting process.

This followed the issuing of a Direction to prohibit scrutineers from the preliminary count due to social distancing measures required to minimise health risks of COVID-19.

All candidates and political parties were kept informed throughout the preliminary count process, including notification of the publication of full results.

Under legislation, the counting of votes is undertaken in a number of stages:

  • The preliminary count, conducted following the close of polls is an unofficial count of results undertaken at a polling booth level. Not all votes, such as postal votes and most of the votes cast during the early voting period, are counted during the preliminary count.
  • The official count commences from Sunday (commencement times vary depending on individual locations) under the supervision of the relevant Returning Officer. The preliminary count is always counted again as part of the official count and declaration and postal vote scrutiny commences.

Depending on the number and composition of votes cast in an election, the official count process can take up to two weeks.  The large number of postal votes sent in the local government elections (approximately 570,000) and new social distancing measures to be applied during the scrutineering process are expected to extend the counting process.

The official count will proceed as planned from 9am on Sunday, 29 March 2020 and results will be published to the ECQ website at www.ecq.qld.gov.au.

28 March 2020

Democracy’s voice is heard 

Around 750,000 voters have had their say today in the 2020 local government elections.

Their voices have been added to the more than 1.2 million electors who voted early and the 570,000 electors who received a postal vote.

Electoral Commissioner Mr Pat Vidgen said these early figures suggest at least 75 per cent turnout rate overall, although the final turnout will be determined after return of postal votes.

“This is approaching the turnout for the 2016 local government elections, which is an extraordinary result, given the circumstances,” he said.

“Heading into polling day, early voting levels were already high, with 55 percent of eligible voters choosing to pre-poll, or apply for a postal or telephone vote.

“Our telephone voting line was extremely busy, with more than 175,000 people calling our 1300 number and over 45,000 electors registering for telephone voting.

“I want to assure voters who tried to vote, but did not get the opportunity to do so, that you will get a chance to tell us about your circumstances,” Mr Vidgen said.

Two state by-elections and 77 local government elections were being decided today.

“The vast majority of our community understands that government is important, now more than ever,” Mr Vidgen said.

“Preliminary counting is now underway, and results will be published on the ECQ website as they become available throughout the evening.

“The official count will begin tomorrow, and we look forward to the participation of scrutineers in that process, as usual.

“We have altered our counting practices to ensure that social distancing is preserved meaning the count will take a little longer than usual.

“There are also 570,000 postal votes to be included in the count, and these must be received by the ECQ by 5pm on Tuesday 7 April.

“I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the Queenslanders who voted in these extraordinary circumstances, as well as the thousands of staff who have worked tirelessly to deliver the elections,” Mr Vidgen said.

27 March 2020

Time it right to have your say

Over 1,300 polling booths will open at 8am tomorrow morning for the 2020 local government elections, and the Bundamba and Currumbin by-elections.

“There are still 10 hours to cast your vote with booths closing at 6pm,” said Electoral Commissioner, Pat Vidgen.

“More than one in three Queenslanders have cast their vote early, so compared to previous election days the booths will be quieter.   There will still be queues outside polling booths so people will need to be patient but once inside a booth voting will be quick and easy”.

“However, mornings are traditionally busier times at elections, and I am encouraging those who can vote in the afternoon to do so, to allow elderly and vulnerable electors to vote when the booths open at 8am,” he said.

Booths will have extra staff on hand to help voters maintain social distancing, and to move elderly and vulnerable voters through queues more quickly.

Mr Vidgen urged anyone who has already registered for a telephone vote to vote early and don’t leave it to the last minute.

The ECQ has produced a short animation about how early voting centres and polling places will be managed.

Key dates for the 2020 Queensland local government elections:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March at 9am – Early voting commences
  • 16 March at 7pm postal vote application close
  • 28 March 2020 – election day

25 March 2020

Telephone voting call centre inundated by callers

The Electoral Commission of Queensland has reminded electors that telephone voting is only available to certain people who are eligible for the service.

Queensland Electoral Commissioner, Pat Vidgen, said that the telephone voting service is experiencing unprecedented demand, and that callers should not jeopardise the availability of this service for those who most need it.

“Electors who are physically impaired, require self-isolation or are in an aged care facility who can’t vote in person, are eligible to register for telephone voting.

“Our call centre is being inundated with calls and despite a major increase in capacity, many calls are from ineligible electors which means that legitimate requests are struggling to be met.

“I implore Queenslanders to check their eligibility before phoning our call centre, so phone lines are free for eligible telephone voters.

“Anyone who has already registered to vote by telephone but has not yet called back to cast their vote should also do this as soon as possible.”

Mr Vidgen said more than 1.3 million electors had already early voted or requested a postal vote.

“Most electors are able to vote in person and I want to assure them that precautions are being taken to ensure voting is exercised quickly and safely.

“There is still plenty of time to vote in person before election day with extended early voting times from 9am to 9pm today and tomorrow, and from 9am to 6pm on Friday.

“Election day voting is from 8am to 6pm on Saturday 28 March.

“I urge all electors to get to a polling booth and have their say about the formation of their local governments.”

Mr Vidgen said all the postal votes are with Australia Post and are being sent priority post, but if ballots don’t arrive in time voters can still vote in person. All election information is at ecq.qld.gov.au

Key dates for the 2020 Queensland local government elections:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March at 9am – Early voting commences
  • 16 March at 7pm postal vote application close
  • 28 March 2020 – election day

The Electoral Commission of Queensland has today assured voters that the local government elections will go ahead on March 28.

“The local government elections are going ahead with advice from the Chief Health Officer,” said Mr Pat Vidgen.

“Voting allows local government to form so that they can make decisions about providing essential services to the community – waste, transport, and community services.  People need their governments now more than ever.

More than 650 000 people have so far chosen to vote early with four days of prepolling still to go.

“At the moment, voting is quick,” he said. “The average time it takes once entering an early voting centre is under 3 minutes and even quicker if people bring their Voter Information Card.

“The ECQ has created more than 300 additional position at 100 early polling places across the state to help voters mover through booths smoothly, and maintain social distancing measures.

“We have written to the people who own the schools, community halls and other locations of our voting booths to strongly encourage them to reconsider and fundraising activity they may have had planned for the day.

“This, along with preventing candidates from handing election material directly to voters, will further limit the number of people gathering in or around a voting booth at any one time.”

Early voting centres will be open from 9am to 6pm tomorrow and Friday, and from 9am to 9pm on Wednesday and Thursday. Polling booths will be open on election day, Saturday 28 March, from 8am to 6pm.

For all 2020 local government election information go to www.ecq.qld.gov.au.

Key dates for the 2020 local government elections:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March at 7pm – Postal vote applications close
  • 16 March to 27 March – Early voting period
  • 28 March – Election day

For media queries, email media@ecq.qld.gov.au or phone 0438 120 699.

21 March 2020

Historic day of Saturday early voting

In a Queensland first, voters have had the opportunity to vote on two consecutive Saturdays in the 2020 local government elections and Currumbin and Bundamba by-elections.

As part of a suite of public safety measures introduced in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) extended early voting hours across the state, including conducting polling on a Saturday.

Candidates and volunteers were also subject to new rules which prohibited the distribution of how-to-vote cards and other election material at polling booths.

Queensland Electoral Commissioner, Pat Vidgen, visited early voting centres today and said there was good compliance with the Direction about Display of How-to Vote Cards and Election Material issued on 20 March.

“In these unprecedented circumstances, it’s pleasing to see that voters, candidates and polling officials are all taking steps to comply with the hygiene practices and social distancing measures we all now need to abide by.

“The ECQ is putting public safety first in delivering these elections and providing extra opportunities for electors to vote is one way we can avoid having a large concentration of people visiting polling booths on election day.

“I encourage everyone who hasn’t done so already to get out and vote early this week, taking advantage of the extra opening hours”, Mr Vidgen said.

Early voting centres will be open from 9am to 6pm on Monday, Tuesday and Friday, and from 9am to 9pm on Wednesday and Thursday. Polling booths will be open on election day, Saturday 28 March, from 8am to 6pm.

For all 2020 local government election information go to www.ecq.qld.gov.au.

Key dates for the 2020 local government elections:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March at 7pm – Postal vote applications close
  • 16 March to 27 March – Early voting period
  • 28 March – Election day

For media queries, email media@ecq.qld.gov.au or phone 0438 120 699.

18 March 2020

New processes for elections following PM’s announcement

The Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) is initiating additional measures to manage the movement of people through polling places following the National Cabinet’s decision to ban non-essential static indoor gatherings of more than 100 people.

Queensland Electoral Commissioner, Pat Vidgen, said that the ECQ had identified the polling places with higher expected numbers of voters.

“For these booths, we will put additional measures in place to make sure only 100 people are inside at any one time, and voters waiting outside have the space they need to practice social distancing.

“Voters should continue to observe the guidelines outlined by the Prime Minister regarding maintaining distances of 1.5 metres and applying appropriate hygiene practices.

“Staff will be on hand inside the polling booths to help move people through the voting process efficiently.”

Mr Vidgen said Voter Information Cards are also arriving in mailboxes all over the state and by bringing these to polling booths, the process of marking electors off the roll and issuing ballot papers is streamlined.

“We appreciate the cooperation of Queenslanders in these unprecedented circumstances,” he said.

“Elections are an essential service that ensure continuity of democratic representation. The high numbers of people who have already voted clearly show that the majority of Queenslanders are keen to have their say.

“Almost another 100,000 early votes have been cast today.  There has been overwhelming cooperation from the public during these challenging circumstances”, Mr Vidgen said.

In a first for Queensland, the ECQ is offering late-night voting at almost 130 early voting centres. Extended hours will start from tonight and tomorrow with early voting centres remaining open until 9pm.  For the first time, voting will be offered on Saturday, 21 March as well as on election day, Saturday, 28 March.

Mr Vidgen said postal vote applications are at an all-time high, topping 540,000 with applications still being processed and ballots posted out to voters.

“You don’t need to wait until election day to fill out your postal ballot. We are urging postal voters to complete and return their ballots sooner rather than later” he said.

The ECQ continues to seek the advice of health authorities to inform its arrangements for the local government elections.

For all 2020 local government elections information go to www.ecq.qld.gov.au

Key dates for the 2020 Queensland local government elections:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March at 9am – Early voting commences
  • 16 March at 7pm postal vote application close
  • 28 March 2020 – election day

Media contact
0438 120 699
media@ecq.qld.gov.au

Early voting numbers in the 2020 local government elections have reached unprecedented numbers with over 169,257 Queenslanders already casting their vote at the close of early voting today, Tuesday 17 March.

Queensland Electoral Commissioner, Pat Vidgen, said the number is nearly four times that of the first two days of voting in the 2016 local government elections.

“Queensland electors have embraced early voting in record numbers with 73,900 casting their vote at yesterday’s pre-polling and over 95,000 voting today,” he said.

“The 2016 local government elections saw around 48,000 votes cast over the first two days, so the increase is more than an astonishing 121,000 voters.

“Although we were expecting a rise in early voting, this increase is much greater than predicted.

“Clearly electors are hearing our message about taking advantage of early voting to mitigate exposure to COVID-19.”

Mr Vidgen also announced an extension of voting hours in most early voting centres to cater for demand.

“Pre-polling is available at 128 early voting centres between 9am and 9pm on Wednesday and Thursday this week and next week, and on Saturday 21 March between 9am and 5pm.

“This is the first time ever that Queensland electors have had two Saturdays available for voting.

“I encourage electors to visit our website to find their closest early voting centre and hours of operation so they can have their say,” Mr Vidgen said.

Additionally, the ECQ has initiated special voting times for more vulnerable electors, such as people aged 60 and over between 9am and 11am daily.

The Commissioner said the ECQ has implemented other measures including additional cleaning in polling booths, encouraging electors to bring their own pen or pencil when they vote, providing hand sanitiser, encouraging candidates to distribute their how-to-vote flyers without handling them, asking all political stakeholders to limit supporters at polling booths and putting on extra ECQ staff to manage queueing safely.

Postal vote applications have also reached unprecedented levels with over 500,000 Queenslanders choosing this voting option.

For all 2020 local government elections information go to www.ecq.qld.gov.au

Key dates for the 2020 Queensland local government elections:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March at 9am – Early voting commences
  • 16 March at 7pm postal vote application close
  • 28 March 2020 – election day



Media contact
0438 120 699
media@ecq.qld.gov.au

15 March 2020

Local government election update

The Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) is implementing a range of extra measures for the 2020 local government elections and Currumbin and Bundamba by-elections to make sure that a safe environment is provided to Queenslanders voting in the elections.

The ECQ has been closely monitoring statements by the Prime Minister and the advice of health authorities in considering how to conduct polling in these elections.

“The local government elections are proceeding in accordance with advice that only non-essential mass gatherings should be cancelled”, said Queensland’s Electoral Commissioner, Mr Pat Vidgen.

“Elections facilitate an essential service by providing for democratic representation for Queenslanders.

“However, we recognise that this is an extraordinary situation and are adapting our service model accordingly. This includes additional hygiene precautions and people management measures to be implemented at the nearly 1500 early voting centres and polling booths across Queensland.

“I ask for the understanding and cooperation of all voters to make sure that the elections are conducted smoothly and with minimal impact on voters and election staff.

“This is a unique and evolving situation and we will update voters if circumstances change. I encourage people to check the ECQ website for up-to-date information about how to cast their vote”, Mr Vidgen said.

Applications for postal votes will close at 7pm on Monday, 16 March 2020, in accordance with the Local Government Electoral Act 2011. This deadline is established under the legislation for the election on 28 March and cannot be altered by the ECQ.

“Understandably, there has been a huge demand for postal votes this weekend.  Since Friday afternoon, we have received over 96,000 new applications for postal votes”, Mr Vidgen said.

The ECQ extended its operating hours over the weekend in order to respond to the anticipated level of demand.

Additionally, the ECQ will be implementing a range of new measures for people attending early voting centres and polling booths to vote in-person.

This includes sourcing additional supplies of hand sanitiser for use by voters at polling booths.  Due to high levels of demand, these supplies are expected to be available at early voting centres by mid-week.

Voters are also encouraged to bring their own pen or pencil with them to vote as an additional hygiene precaution.

Other measures include:

  • Additional cleaning of polling booth areas will be undertaken to ensure that all surfaces are regularly disinfected.
  • Extra staff will be employed at polling booths to assist with queue control and monitoring numbers of people in attendance.
  • Vote issuing tables and screens will be positioned to maximise distance between all people in attendance.
  • New measures will be implemented to take votes of residents of aged care facilities which were to be ‘declared institutions’.

Early voting will start from Monday, 16 March 2020 and generally open from 9am to 5pm during the first week of early voting, and from 9am to 6pm during the second week of early voting.  The ECQ will be monitoring demand and is exploring options to extend voting hours.

Further information will be released and published on the ECQ website about extended opening hours during the early voting period.

It is important to remember that voting is compulsory. Electors should consider which voting options are most suitable for them at these elections.

Key election dates:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March – Early voting commences
  • 16 March at 7pm postal vote applications close
  • 28 March 2020 – election day

For media queries email media@ecq.qld.gov.au or phone 0438 120 699.

13 March 2020

Local government elections proceeding

The Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) has carefully considered today’s decisions by the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) regarding actions to protect Australians from the impact of coronavirus.

A key outcome arising from the COAG meeting was advising against the conduct of organised non-essential mass gatherings of over 500 people.

Having considered the public statements from First Ministers at COAG, and taking advice from Queensland’s health authorities and experts, the Queensland Electoral Commissioner, Mr Pat Vidgen, has determined that it is in the public interest to proceed with the local government elections and the State by-elections in Bundamba and Currumbin on 28 March 2020.

“The forthcoming Queensland elections are essential public events required to ensure the continuity of democratic representation and public administration across the State”, Mr Vidgen said. Mr Vidgen also noted that “It is extremely unlikely that more than 500 people would ever be in a polling booth at any one time, and electors generally only spend a short period of time in a booth.”

“The ECQ will continue to monitor advice being issued by health authorities to ensure that the elections are conducted with minimal risk to the health and safety of Queenslanders.”

A range of voting options are available for the 2020 elections including:

  • Postal voting – any elector can apply to receive a postal vote through the ECQ website or by calling 1300 881 665.  Under legislation, postal vote applications must close at 7pm on Monday, 16 March 2020.
  • Early voting – early voting will start from Monday, 16 March 2020 in all councils where in-person voting is required. The number of people attending early voting centres is traditionally lower than on election day, so voters may wish to cast their vote at a time when fewer people are expected to be present. Early voting times vary across councils, and details are available on the ECQ website.

It is important to remember that voting is compulsory and electors should consider which voting options are most suitable for them at these elections.

The ECQ will also take additional measures including:

  • Actively monitoring the numbers of electors in busy booths to limit the number of voters in attendance to fewer than 500 at any one time.
  • Providing current and updated Queensland Health advice to all voters and polling officials.  This includes recommended personal hygiene measures when visiting polling booths, maintaining 1.5 metre distance from people coughing or sneezing, and staying at home if sick.
  • Offering telephone voting to all electors in ‘declared institutions’ such as aged care facilities, rather than conducting in-person mobile polling.
  • Allowing electors to bring their own pens or pencils to polling booths to cast their vote.

The COAG communique detailing the outcomes of the COAG meeting are available at: https://www.coag.gov.au/meeting-outcomes/coag-meeting-communique-13-march-2020.

For the latest information on COVID-19 visit https://www.health.qld.gov.au/clinical-practice/guidelines-procedures/diseases-infection/diseases/coronavirus/public-info-novel-coronavirus/frequently-asked-questions-novel-coronavirus.

Key election dates:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March – Early voting commences
  • 16 March at 7pm postal vote applications close
  • 28 March 2020 – election day

For media queries email media@ecq.qld.gov.au or phone 0438 120 699.

11 March 2020

COVID-19 and Queensland’s local government elections

This month, more than three million Queenslanders will go to the polls to have their say in 77 local government elections and two by-elections.

The Electoral Commissioner, Pat Vidgen, said that the Electoral Commission of Queensland is monitoring advice from the Queensland Chief Health Officer regarding the appropriate response to the emergence of COVID-19.

“The current advice provided by Queensland Health is that there is no need to cancel mass gatherings or events, or take additional precautions to normal practice,” Mr Vidgen said.

“We have provided advice to temporary election staff, and are asking that members of the public take normal common sense precautions, such as good hand and respiratory hygiene.

“This is, of course, a fast-moving situation, and we will continue to monitor the situation closely, and take advice from the relevant authorities, including Queensland Health. If that advice changes we are prepared to respond appropriately.

“At this stage we remain focused on making sure that all Queenslanders have the services they need to cast their vote in the local government elections.

“Voting remains compulsory.”

Key election dates:

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 28 February – Close of electoral roll
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 4 March – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March – Early voting commences
  • 16 March at 7pm postal vote applications close
  • 28 March 2020 – election day

For media queries email media@ecq.qld.gov.au or phone 0438 120 699

For the latest information on COVID-19 visit https://www.health.qld.gov.au/clinical-practice/guidelines-procedures/diseases-infection/diseases/coronavirus/public-info-novel-coronavirus/frequently-asked-questions-novel-coronavirus

22 February 2020

The 2020 Queensland local government elections have been announced and eligible Queenslanders must act now to ensure their voice is heard on election day, 28 March.

More than 3 million Queenslanders will go to the polls to have their say in 77 local government elections on 28 March.

Electoral Commissioner Pat Vidgen said if you’re a Queensland based Australian citizen and not enrolled you won’t be able to have your say.

”All Queensland citizens aged 18 years and over on election day are required by law to enrol and vote in the local elections.” Mr Vidgen said.

“Check your enrolment today to ensure that you’re on the roll, and that your address and name are listed correctly.”

“You can check your details on the Australian Electoral Commission website at www.aec.gov.au.”

The best and quickest way to enrol or update your address or name details is online but if you are not able to go online, you can get a paper enrolment form at any Australia Post office.

Correctly completed applications must be returned to the AEC by 5pm on 28 February 2020.

For more information about the local elections and the ways you can vote, go to the ECQ website at ECQ.qld.gov.au.

Key dates for the 2020 Queensland Local Government elections

  • 22 February – Notice of Election
  • 22 February to 3 March – Candidate nominations
  • 28 February 2020 – Close of electoral roll
  • 4 March 2020 – Ballot paper draw
  • 16 March 2020 – Early voting commences
  • 28 March 2020 – Election day

For media queries email media@ecq.qld.gov.au or phone 0438 120 699

2019 Media Statements

11 November 2019

The Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) is now recruiting more than 10,000 staff to work at the next local government elections in March 2020.

A range of temporary positions are available across the state and people can apply to work for a day, a night or a couple of weeks.

Electoral Commissioner Pat Vidgen encouraged Queenslanders to lodge an application and be part of democracy in action.

“We need people to help us deliver democracy in polling booths from Thursday Island to Goondiwindi and out to Birdsville,” Mr Vidgen said.

“There are a range of temporary positions available and all staff are paid so it is a great way to earn some extra money, whether you work for a day or a week.”

“It is also a really meaningful job that looks good on a resume, so that’s a bonus for students and people who might have limited work experience.”

To work at an election, you must be an Australian citizen, at least 16 years-old and you must be on the electoral roll.

Applicants aged 16 or 17 can be provisionally enrolled as they’re still too young to vote.

“The ECQ normally consists of about 50 staff but come election time we need more than 10,000 people so that’s why we’ve already started recruiting,” Mr Vidgen said.

“I’d encourage anyone who’d like to work with us in March 2020 to head to the ECQ website and apply now.”

A full list of position descriptions, pay rates, eligibility criteria and other details can be found on the ECQ website.

Training and support will be provided to successful applicants.

ENDS

Media contact: 0438 120 699

3 June 2019

The Electoral Commissioner of Queensland, Mr Pat Vidgen, will allow political parties to return those donations ruled unlawful by the High Court of Australia in the case Spence vs State of Queensland, subject to strict conditions.

These conditions act to uphold the State’s electoral laws which ban political donations by property developers and their close associates.

Should any party fail to comply with all conditions, the Electoral Commissioner reserves the right to take further action to recover unlawful donations as a debt to the State.

A full statement of reasons  PDF (0.06 MB) for the Electoral Commissioner’s decision in this matter is available.

ENDS

Media contact: Nicole Butler

17 May 2019

The Electoral Commission of Queensland (ECQ) is currently considering the High Court’s reasons for its ruling in the case of Spence v State of Queensland.

The reasons were published this week to explain the High Court’s decision to uphold the Queensland ban on political donations by property developers, while striking out amendments to the Commonwealth Electoral Act that impacted on the State’s ban.

Those amendments had sought to allow Queensland political parties to accept property developer donations that may be used for federal purposes.

Given the complexity of the legal circumstances, the ECQ is obtaining further advice and carefully considering the impact of the ruling on any donations received by political parties that are now regarded as unlawful.

As soon as possible, the ECQ will formally advise all registered political parties of any action that may be required to ensure they comply with the High Court decision.  

ENDS

Media contact:  Nicole Butler

For all media enquiries please email media@ecq.qld.gov.au or phone 0438 120 699.

The media information kit PDF (0.49 MB) for the 2020 local government elections.